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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the british press. now, most disturbingly, sean hoare, one two of the whistle-blowing journalists that brought it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. it's the beginning of the news corporation's attempts at damage control. coulson stepping in to blunt brooks' answe
. sean hoare the initial "news of the world" whistle blower is found dead. david cameron cuts short of visit to africa. >> i'm determined to get to the bottom of it. >> tonight we examine the damage he is suffering and the state of the met. then we'll talk about that committee hearing with rupert murdoch tomorrow. also tonight the united states prepared last month their drones have stopped killing pakistani civilians. we have news evidence which says that's wrong. good evening is britain's biggest and most important police force merely inexcept or corrupt or possibly both? you can forgive people for wondering. public confidence in the police is said to be rocking after two high-profile resignation. the met police chief admitting he took a free stay at a health spa, a botched initial investigation into phone-hacking and tonight the revelation that a former senior executive at "the news of the world" was working for the met at the same time. how far wan we trust the yard and the people who run it. here is richard watson. >> reporters would meet some of the met's most senior officers i
. >> on the british hacking scandal, just a short time ago, police say sean hoare-- that's the reporter who first alleged widespread hacking at the now ended news of nation-- he's been found dead in his home. (laughter). >> jon: do you think he died of natural causes or was it murdoch? (ominous music). (applause) well, i'm sure scotland yard's on this case like cream on a... >> right now police say the death is not considered suspicious. (laughter) >> jon: well, i guess the guys who were bribed don't think there's anything suspicious in the death of the guy who blew the whistle on the company providing the bribes, i'm satisfied. (laughter) of course, the whole business was prelude to today's main event. rupert murdoch and his son james appearing before parliament's committee on culture, media, sport, and vowel-shaped furniture. (laughter) confess before the u-shaped desk of contrition! don't make us bring in the e! (laughter) the whole day of testimony was amazing but perhaps no moment more remarkable than murdoch interrupting his son's opening statement. >> of the "news of the world" newspaper.
. and in a strange twist to this whole affair, one of the most public whistle-blowers, a man called sean hoare, who was a former entertainment reporter for the "news of the world" was found dead at his home this evening. so far, anyway, police are saying the death is unexplained but not suspicious. bob? >> schieffer: thank you very much, liz. liz palmer in london. in this country, president obama claimed some progress in negotiations to try to find a way to raise the debt limit and keep the government from defaulting on its financial obligations. the reason for the optimism was not all together clear but a cbs news poll out tonight reflects the political toll this crisis is taking. the public is split right down the middle over the president's handling of the situation, but congress fares worse. 58% disapprove of how democrats are handling it, 78% disapprove of what republicans are doing. we want to welcome tonight our new white house correspondent norah o'donnell to the broadcast. she has more on all of this and the poll. norah? >> reporter: good evening, bob. tonight we're learning new details ab
home yesterday. however, police a sean hoare's death is not considered suspicious. he once told the new york sometimes while working for news of the world that phone hacks was widely used and even encouraged. >>> a identify profile hacking report is to blame for false reports that rupert murdoch was found dead. they were able to hack into the sun's web site and redirect readers to the hoax. >>> again, today's questioning about the phone hacking scandal is set to start later this morning. we'll bring you live coverage beginning at 9:30. >>> the senate continuing to work on a back-up plan for the debt ceiling. >>> a look at the morning's other top stories. d.c. police are investigating a homicide. it happened around 3:00 this morning in the # hundred block of randolph street northwest. when police arrived on the scene, they found a man who had been shot. he later died. no word this morning on a motive or a suspect. >>> d.c. police also still searching for the gunman who opened fire on a busy street. chaos broke out just before noon yesterday on martin luther king avenue. witnesses say tw
and disturbing news of the death of sean hoare, one of the first whistle blowers about the hacking going on at some of the newspapers when he worked under andy coulson. what are details on that? >> reporter: all right. so sean gives details to the news of the world. sean hoare's details of what happened describing the hacking and takes part in a "the new york times" expose in 2010 on the subject and one of those people who again and again and again says that top executives at news international, news of the world, knew what was going on. now, he's also believed to be an alcoholic or was a drug addict. he lived a very lively life. the police say his death is unexplained but not suspicious. he wasn't in good health. whether that could mean suicide or just some form of death because of overindulgence we don't know. whatever way we turn whether to rupert murdoch who only last week in the "wall street journal" said that minor mistakes have been made in the investigation but then says to the british people, sorry for what has happened. james murdoch who says quite publicly now he didn't know c
to exclusives and others, he was the individual who first accused andy colson. shaen who are -- se-sean hoare mobile phone signals and according to him, they did this in exchange for cash payments so he was filled with all sorts of revelations and accusations of what the news of the world was up to. >> so he's the latest layer to this story you've been covering. rupert murdock tomorrow is in the hot seat. he's been summoned to answer questions and just translate that for me. does that mean he will be sworn in to testify or is he simply asks questions and what kind of questions can they anticipate? >> i don't know whether he's going to be actually made to swear an oath before the select committee of members of the british parliament, but obviously, this is, you know, the british government and british mps, british lawmakers wanting to hold to account, the scrutinize, cross-examination the head of news corps about the activities of his executives, what he knew about his company's activities, what his executives knew. this is a huge scandal that's really rocked the british establishment, in the
no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, it was a heavily lawyered performance but for all that i thought it was pretty skilled. the lawmakers who were a lot more brief, better briefed themselves than the parliamentary committees in london and britain usually are, they are not... they are a shadow of their counterparts on capitol hill but today i thought that the lawmakers did pretty well but they didn't lay too many gloves on the murdochs. i think that it was greatly to their advantage in a paradoxical way that mr. marbles, i think his name is, entered from stage right with his custard pie or his shaving foam pie, whatever it was because it presented rupert murdoch wh
? >>> and death of a whistle blower. sean hoare lived the tabloid life to the limit. drugs, booze, and cell phones. that's how he got his sensati sensational stories. looks like he saved the best one for last. >>> then, news corp. and politicians, we've seen the cozy connection in britain, but here in america, for political contributions, you'll never guess who gets the most murdoch money. >>> back now to our in-depth report, the murdoch hacking scandal and a key question, how deeply involved were the police and exactly why did they shut down their original phone hacking investigation back in 2007? my guests tonight worked with murdoch as senior editor for the times of london and has insider's knowledge of the close or perhaps too close relationship between the police and the tabloids. welcome, nicholas waptchak. i want to get to the hearing, but this was fascinating to watch. >> i can't think of anything that was so gripping and on the expectation that something new was going to come out the murdochs wriggling on the end of the hook. >> once the police investigation closed in 2007, that was it. d
about the phone hacking at "news of the world"? >> first of all, sean hoare who cracked under the pressure, he did drink too much and died last week, he started it, and it was presented -- i just bought a bar in the south of england about nine months ago which is where hugh grant taped me. i was semi retiring from journal into. and the guardian presented it as a fantastic story. it was the british watergate and i was offered the chance to be part of it oovps. the whole point was, if we can label our former bosses, rebekah brooks, andy coulson who are arrested, not criminal masterminds but engaged in a media empire where criminality was rif, if that media empire got david cameron elected as the british prime minister, that's a good story. >> i have a break coming up. since you mentioned rebekah brooks and andy coulson, both former editors of "news of the world," do you have any doubt that they knew phone hacking was going on at that paperer? >> i have no doubt whatsoever. piers morgan was also my editor, but in that time in 1994-'5, it wasn't illegal. you could sit outside some
. they are saying sean hoar's death is not considered suspicious but it's an added layer into this whole story. >> an odd coincidence. on top of that two of the websites from murdock newspapers were hacked into, one of them had a fake story that murdock himself had died. it was a fake folk story but the ripple effects keep on coming. >> a hacking, a bit of a taste of their own medicine, perhaps. >>> if you are in the san francisco bay area and need work done on your bike they're here are more than happy to help you out at mike's bikes. >> don't try to pay the bill with pennies. they don't want them and they're not accepting them. the ship rounds every cash transaction down to the nearest nickel. >> shop owners say the policy saves them about 2,000 bucks a year because it takes time to count all those pennies in the the till. it costs the government 1.7 cents to mint each penny. they're saying the penny is inconsequential to the bug anymore. >> it kind of is is. who pays in pennies? more "world news now" coming up after the break, don't go far. hó [ male announcer ] every day, thousands of peo
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)